Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Jobs

The growth and development of computer programs supported by artificial intelligence has led to intense debate around regulatory difficulties and because of the technology’s potential effects on employment. Are people’s concerns in these areas warranted?

From the earliest days of civilization, man, as a single thinker on earth, sought to reduce the need for physical work by inventing tools. First came the wheel and the transportation of food over farther distances with less manpower. We have been taught to evolve by creating more with less effort. For many, this was negative in the short term. Those who were once freight carriers lost their jobs. The wheel was invented around 3000 BC. You might think I´m crazy to start a technological discussion about this historical moment, but the historical reference is useful to be made in order to demystify the discussion, and to then further analyze the data we have. 

Moving forward some years later, at the start of the industrial revolution, millions of people protested in the streets of England and the United States against the introduction of weaving machinery. On the surface, the “destruction” of jobs seemed quite high. However, in truth, these jobs were never really destroyed, but rather professionally reformed. Factories, with a drastic boost in production, were increasing the salaries of those who adapted to the machinery while simultaneously reducing their overhead costs. Both countries’ wealth grew as a result due to increases in disposable income for families, and more jobs created to support the burgeoning count weaving and spinning industry. Indeed, the number of people employed in weaving jumped from 7,900 to over 320,000 after the invention of the weaving machine.  

Now after a little history revision, let’s return to the present. 

Recently PWC, one of the world’s largest consultants, launched a global study in which they estimated that artificial intelligence in the UK will replace 20% of today’s jobs within the next 20 years. However, they also estimated that artificial intelligence will create just as many jobs as it replaces. Sectors at high risk include law, finance, insurance, drivers and white-collar workers. Areas like education, science, information, communication and computing are among those that will be most valued in the future.  

Nowadays, from the moment we wake up and look at our mobile phones, until the moment we lay down and check our Facebook feed for the last time, we’re in constant contact with artificial intelligence that gives us the kind of information that allows us to make better decisions. We need to accelerate the transformation of educational systems, adapting them to the new realities of the fourth technological revolution with a particular focus on programming disciplines. We also need to find ways to support professional training programs that respond to the demands of the labor market. 

Ultimately, there is no future in which machines will be able to replace what binds human beings: creativity, intuition and love. At the end of the day, perhaps AI will make us even more human.

An Interview With Dinheiro Vivo

At last week’s Web Summit, we were lucky enough to sit down with Dinheiro Vivo, a leading financial publication in Portugal. Our conversation touched on everything from the quality-focused approach to training data to AI use-cases across industries. Watch the full interview here (in Portuguese), or check out the English transcription below:

Dinheiro Vivo [DV] – For those who still do not know your work, what does DefinedCrowd do?

Daniela Braga [DB] – We are a data collection and cleaning platform for Machine Learning and for Artificial Intelligence. Our platform combines crowdsourcing with machine learning. A mixture of people and machines working at the same time.

Artificial Intelligence is the imitation of a human brain, artificially. To develop our own intelligence, we go to school, we read many books. It takes a lifetime for a person to be able to react and make decisions in their daily lives. The way machines learn is similar. But with the computational capacity that is currently possible using the cloud and our platform, in just 3 months we can combine thousands of human brains in the same computational memory.

Our platform combines crowdsourcing with machine learning. A mixture of people and machines working at the same time.

DV – And then (the data) is used in applications that we use every day?

DB– Namely Apple Siri, Google Assistant, Alexa. Self-driving cars and even more industrial applications like machines that are doing quality control instead of having people doing it. Or at airports with automatic flight controllers.

DV – And this year was a dazzling year, an investment round, new partners, an office in Tokyo. What have you done to achieve this success?

DB – Especially in the United States, our largest market is still the United States, followed by Japan and followed by Europe. Clients are more open, they’re investing in Artificial Intelligence.

There are many companies in machine learning but there is practically no one doing data cleaning and treatment like us. It’s like the spades and pickaxes of the gold rush. We are making the shovels and picks of AI, of modern times.

DV- And coming to Web Summit also makes all the difference, right?

DB– Our growth milestones have been basically aligned with those of Web Summit. We have been here since 2016, which was the first year Portugal hosted Web Summit. We had closed our seed series. Last year (2017) we basically met the group of investors to close the series A. And this year we are here to be on the list of the top 10 AI companies in the world.

DV – And finally, when you leave Web Summit, what do you expect to take with you?

DB – This year it’s basically a visibility and recruitment maneuver- we are in an aggressive recruitment phase. We want to demonstrate that this is really the best place to work in Portugal. We’re also looking to continue developing partnerships, and solidify go-to-market strategy. Next year, I would like for 50% of our revenue to come from partnerships.

Bringing Inspiration Home: Our COO Reports on Microsoft Inspire

Hi everybody. Happy to be writing you from the cool PNW air after spending the first part of the week at the Microsoft Inspire Conference in Vegas.

Inspire was a fantastic opportunity to get face-time with colleagues from the Microsoft Partner Network’s startup ecosystem. I made fantastic business contacts, had great discussions, and most importantly, got a few days to dedicate my focus to DefinedCrowd’s long-term growth next to a lot of smart people with firsthand knowledge of the pains startups experience when they begin to scale.

Microsoft Inspire first day

I also had the opportunity to attend presentations and think about the AI revolution we spend our day-to-day grinding toward on a macro-level. I was—I’ll just say it— inspired by a presentation on Microsoft’s AI Earth initiative and the development of ML models that improve conservation, farming practices, and understandings of diverse ecosystems. At DefinedCrowd, we’re proud to be leading the way to a future where AI plays an essential role in solving some of our biggest societal ills.

That’s not just some line I’m being fed from marketing. For us, it’s a pillar. Before founding DefinedCrowd, our CEO Daniela spent years developing and advocating for widespread use of speech interfaces as the basis of assistive technologies (Cortana and Alexa have since proved her right) mainly because she saw the benefits to the blind, elderly and infirm. We believe in what we’re building and in the possibility for a world where fateful calls from freeway shoulders disappear, and no doctor has to say “if only we’d caught it earlier” ever again.

However, we know the AI revolution only gets us to that future if there’s a moral code at its foundation. That’s why I want to close with the idea of a “Hippocratic Oath” for AI, first proposed by Microsoft’s Brad Smith and Harry Shum in their book The Future Computed, and further drawn out by Oren Etzioni at TechCrunch (If you don’t read them you should. Right now. Start here, or here, or even here to see what they’ve been saying about us.)

I won’t lay it out entirely. Instead, here are some lines that stuck with me:

“1. [We] will apply, for the benefit of the humanity, all measures required, avoiding those twin traps of over-optimism and uniformed pessimism.

2. [We] will remember that there is an art to AI as well as science, and that human concerns outweigh technological ones.

3. My [Our] AI will seek to collaborate with people for the greater good, rather than usurp the human role and supplant them.

DefinedCrowd will grow this year. A lot. At Inspire, I heard a ton of buzz surrounding “new” use cases for AI in industries like Fintech, Food & Drink, Retail, and more. None of those use cases surprised me. Because our product offering is, and always has been, industry agnostic, we’ve been doing work across industries like these since day one. We’re in a fantastic position as more kinds of businesses find more solutions in AI and ML models. Just know that as we grow, we’re thinking hard about how to do it the right way.

A talk at Microsoft Inspire about Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

Thanks to everyone at Microsoft who helped put Inspire on, and who took some time to meet me in Vegas. I can’t wait to see where we are this time next year.

In the meantime, if you want to know how AI can solve problems for you, Check out  our  solutions. And, speaking of growth, we’re hiring. A lot. Check out our  Careers page for opportunities to build incredible things with us at DefinedCrowd.

We’re looking forward to hearing from you.