Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Jobs

The growth and development of computer programs supported by artificial intelligence has led to intense debate around regulatory difficulties and because of the technology’s potential effects on employment. Are people’s concerns in these areas warranted?

From the earliest days of civilization, man, as a single thinker on earth, sought to reduce the need for physical work by inventing tools. First came the wheel and the transportation of food over farther distances with less manpower. We have been taught to evolve by creating more with less effort. For many, this was negative in the short term. Those who were once freight carriers lost their jobs. The wheel was invented around 3000 BC. You might think I´m crazy to start a technological discussion about this historical moment, but the historical reference is useful to be made in order to demystify the discussion, and to then further analyze the data we have. 

Moving forward some years later, at the start of the industrial revolution, millions of people protested in the streets of England and the United States against the introduction of weaving machinery. On the surface, the “destruction” of jobs seemed quite high. However, in truth, these jobs were never really destroyed, but rather professionally reformed. Factories, with a drastic boost in production, were increasing the salaries of those who adapted to the machinery while simultaneously reducing their overhead costs. Both countries’ wealth grew as a result due to increases in disposable income for families, and more jobs created to support the burgeoning count weaving and spinning industry. Indeed, the number of people employed in weaving jumped from 7,900 to over 320,000 after the invention of the weaving machine.  

Now after a little history revision, let’s return to the present. 

Recently PWC, one of the world’s largest consultants, launched a global study in which they estimated that artificial intelligence in the UK will replace 20% of today’s jobs within the next 20 years. However, they also estimated that artificial intelligence will create just as many jobs as it replaces. Sectors at high risk include law, finance, insurance, drivers and white-collar workers. Areas like education, science, information, communication and computing are among those that will be most valued in the future.  

Nowadays, from the moment we wake up and look at our mobile phones, until the moment we lay down and check our Facebook feed for the last time, we’re in constant contact with artificial intelligence that gives us the kind of information that allows us to make better decisions. We need to accelerate the transformation of educational systems, adapting them to the new realities of the fourth technological revolution with a particular focus on programming disciplines. We also need to find ways to support professional training programs that respond to the demands of the labor market. 

Ultimately, there is no future in which machines will be able to replace what binds human beings: creativity, intuition and love. At the end of the day, perhaps AI will make us even more human.